• College,  Stories

    Friend$hip: Tackling Tuition as a Community

    Written by Alyssa Alvarez Most students at Biola have one thing in common: a tight budget. Keeping up with the pace of university life while balancing tuition costs can certainly squeeze the wallet, especially when one is making the college journey without financial help from relatives. When a lack of funds threatens to force a departure from Biola, options may seem few and trust in God’s provision is the only beacon of hope. For most, saving grace comes from family members, employment or financial aid. For other students, help arrives from an unexpected source: friends. Austyn Lewis Raising $4,000 in 24 hours might sound impossible. But at first, even Emerson…

  • College,  Stories

    Coach Holmquist: The Man Behind the Wins

    Written by Conner Penfold In an upstairs corridor of the Chase Gymnasium, at a window overlooking the soccer field and the distant La Mirada Civic Center, sits a quiet, reserved man. He presides over all Biola University athletics, and is the mind behind a flourishing men’s basketball team and its countless wins and successful seasons. He is Dave Holmquist, an icon on campus not only for his incredible basketball achievements, but for his character, his love for the players and his love for the game. Holmquist’s passion for basketball, and consequent successes on the court, have elevated him to a level of achievement on par with the greatest coaches of…

  • College,  Stories

    Extra Innings: Biola Pitchers Pursue Pro Baseball

    Written by Ashley Shafer It’s a good thing I met Bobby O’Neill in Common Grounds for our interview, because he really needed a cup of coffee. The exhausted super senior is busy enough with typical college responsibilities like class and a part-time job in the lumber industry. But O’Neill also plays minor league baseball, and the road to the majors is an unbelievably tough and taxing one. O’Neill emphatically ordered black coffee — something his dad introduced him to when he was 12 years old. In addition to teaching his son the importance of a proper caffeine jolt, Vince O’Neill also emphasized hard work and faith in God. These two…

  • College,  Stories

    Teaching to a Different Tune

    Written by Michelle Hong Although teachers are often defined by their occupations, what truly individualizes them are their quirks and their unique pasts. Professors, like anyone in the workforce, have lives and interests beyond what their jobs demand of them. For some Biola professors, this outside interest lies in the realm of music — an art they have pursued in a variety of ways. Elizabeth Larson: Concert Violinist, Music Professor Elizabeth Larson began playing the violin at age 3, made her debut at age 6, toured with the Boston Pops at age 11, joined an international chamber ensemble at age 26 and founded The Geneva Conservatory of Music, in New…

  • College,  Stories

    Making Disciples of All Majors

    Written by Bethany Miller In 1959, the Bible Institute of Los Angeles moved from its bustling downtown location to a quiet plot of land dotted with olive trees. That same year, the school broadened its academic offerings from evangelism and Bible training to a full-fledged liberal arts curriculum, obtained accreditation, and was officially renamed Biola College. Fifty years later, Biola has grown into a university comprising seven schools and 37 undergraduate majors ranging from philosophy to kinesiology. “Biola’s mission has remained the same, but the outreach has really broadened,” says Dr. Rick Bee, director of Alumni Relations. “Now, it’s not just people being prepared to serve in the church or…

  • College,  Stories

    Cars with Character: Climb into the passenger seat for a ride in Biola’s coolest vehicles

    Written by Kelsey Osterman Climb into the passenger seat for a ride in Biola’s coolest vehicles. 1966 Ford Mustang Dr. David Bourgeois Associate professor of information systems, Crowell School of Business When it comes to classic cars, Dr. David Bourgeois has had his share of bad luck. His first Mustang was totaled in 2006, while Bourgeois was driving home from an early morning Bible study. His car was parked at a stoplight when a semi-truck flipped off a freeway exit ramp, crushing Bourgeois’ car and two other vehicles. He was knocked unconscious in the wreck, but escaped without serious injury. About a year later, Bourgeois bought his second vintage Mustang,…

  • College,  Stories

    Roads Less Traveled

    Written by Rebecca Nakashima Students at private, Christian universities are typically expected to fit a specific mold. The prevailing assumption is that they are raised in church-going families and sheltered from the barrage of secular culture. They are often labeled as “good kids” with little real-world experience. While pieces of this stereotype may ring true, it is never really that simple. Some students shatter the mold entirely, throwing off common expectations as they transition from uncommon pasts. A few of these remarkable individuals have arrived at Biola University, each with his or her own powerful story. John Reid “I wanted to go out. I wanted to travel. I wanted to…

  • College,  Stories

    OCC: Off-Campus Cooks – When college kids go culinary

    Written by Pauline Balmas It’s a typical Monday afternoon. Students hurriedly make their way into the Caf, ID cards in hand, desperate to satisfy their ravenous appetites as they grab lunch between a mess of classes. Whether they have less than ten minutes or a full hour, most students take advantage of the plethora of food options the Caf has to offer. Yet, as much as Biola students love eating their fill in the Caf, sometimes the simple fact remains that there really is nothing like a home-cooked meal. To some students, “cooking” is a term limited to Easy Mac or Top Ramen. However, preparing a simple-yet-tasty meal does not…

  • College,  Stories

    A Reason to Rise

    Written by Candace Arce-Lindsay Sometimes it’s hard to get out of bed. Everyday fears, anxieties, weariness, and stress make it difficult to leave the comfort and safety of sleep. Still, there is something that coaxes us into action in the morning, into the struggles and triumphs of each day. On a good day, this something could be the anticipation of seeing a certain pretty face or learning something new. On other days, it’s nothing other than pure necessity. The something differs from person to person, and whether it be the drive of hope, the press of responsibility, or the conviction of their calling, it gets them up and going. I…

  • College,  Stories

    Repositioned: Stories from the Side

    Written by Zachary Fu In the fourth quarter of a riveting basketball game, the home team head coach paces up and down the court sideline. A player on the bench, still in his warm-ups, sits in silence amidst the crowd’s deafening cheering. He tries to hide his frustration, but he is unable to camouflage his deep and evident desire to contribute to the game. Any individual in the stands would be quick to label this player a “bench warmer,” or sometimes even just “the bench.” This collegiate player, however, is both the embodiment of hard work in grueling practices, and in many cases, a former high school star — details…

  • College,  Stories

    America Dreaming

    Written by Adrienne Nunley David Ottestad attended Biola in the fall semester of 2008 before he realized the American Dream wasn’t for him. When the time came to make post-high school plans, Ottestad had no idea what he wanted to do. His parents encouraged him to pursue the four-year college experience, believing, like many American families, in the ability of a bachelor’s degree to ensure some sort of future security. Ottestad wasn’t interested, but he eventually decided on Biola after getting accepted into the film program. In his first semester, Ottestad realized his true passion: music. “Instead of studying,” Ottestad says, “I was writing music in every class.” He began…

  • College,  Stories

    Exchanged

    Written by Stephanie Gertsch Transitioning to college means facing the unknown—leaving behind your home and childhood friends, learning to live in a new world, and suddenly wondering, “Who are these hoards of twenty-year-olds in flip flops?” Whether moving just a few hours away or across an entire country, transitions make life more exciting, but also more difficult. American-born college students wonder if there are any points of contact between themselves and an international student, or if they should respect cultural differences by holding off on cultural assumptions. Newcomers wonder if America is a safe place to learn and grow, or if they must constantly struggle against prejudice and misunderstanding. As…