• Local,  Stories

    Top Ten Music Venues

    Written by Amy Ortega 1. Bourbon Street Bourbon Street, which channels New Orleans through its decorations and cobblestone walkways, is located seven miles from Biola in downtown Fullerton. With space for up to 150 people, Bourbon Street often hosts private parties, but most come to enjoy the live jazz music while they dine. Admission is usually free. Distance from Biola: 7 miles Hours: 6 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Contact: (714) 626-0050 2. Steamers Café A block away from Bourbon Street, Steamers Café is known for hosting jazz bands in its small, intimate space that fits no more than 50 people. Steamers offers the opportunity to sit as close to the act as possible — attendees…

  • Local,  Stories

    Top Five Ethnic Eateries

    Written by Candace Arce-Lindsay Living at Biola can sometimes seem culturally isolating, especially when it comes to cuisine. While on-campus eateries do a great job of keeping students fed and happy, one cannot help but wish for more foreign fare at one time or another. While it’s quick and easy to get your Mexican food fix at the nearest taco stand or to feel cultured wielding chopsticks at Panda Express, Southern California has so much more to offer when it comes to ethnic foods. We tracked down ten students with backgrounds in cultural cuisine, who know the most authentic ethnic restaurants in the Los Angeles area. These places not only…

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    Kent Twitchell: A Portrait of an Artist

    Written by Bethany Miller The 12-story building a few blocks outside of Skid Row seems, because of its age, that it must have stories to tell, but the blacked-out set of double-doors next door to Subway are nondescript. That’s why, when Kent Twitchell lets me in, my jaw nearly drops: Never, from those unassuming doors, would I have guessed that behind them was a cavernous studio space with enough paintings and sketches to fill a wing of the Getty Museum. On the floor, there’s partly-finished portraits of John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan measuring easily 15 feet long; on one wall, sketches of the Founding Fathers, the Statue of Liberty,…

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    Beyond the Gallery

    Written by Candace Arce-Lindsay The art world can often seem exclusive, reserved only for high-class galleries and museums. There are those, however, who have set out to give art a practical function among the poor, the homeless, the disadvantaged. These champions of culture use beauty and expression to inspire hope in the otherwise hopeless and downtrodden. Alegria, founded in 2003 and operated by the Salvation Army, is one such organization that has adopted art as a means of redemption. Located on Sunset Boulevard, the institution houses 72 homeless families affected by HIV/AIDS and provides childcare, food services, professional medical facilities, job coaching, G.E.D. completion and spiritual care. While the care…

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    10 in 1: Familiar Faces, One Mile From Campus

    Written by Beth Cissel Carla, Splash Aquatic Center When I was a kid… we would swim all day and they could never get me out of the pool. Carla comes to Splash Aquatic Center to swim almost everyday. Her vivacious and friendly presence is well known to the staff and other regular swimmers — she likes to go “where people know her name”. “This will be my fourth year [swimming at Splash]. You know why? It makes me happy. I try to spend a lot of time where people know me, people see me — you feel like you’re part of the family” In order for her to keep peace…

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    Little House on the Heights

    Written by Alyson Luthi If you have just turned onto Interstate 101 heading north from Biola and are winding through its maze of concrete walls and climbing ivy, veer off onto the Soto St. exit, and you will find yourself dumped into the heterogeneous neighborhood that is Boyle Heights, Los Angeles. The residents of Boyle Heights hasten to correct any misconceptions that their community is an inclusion of L.A.’s East Side and the stigmas that accompany it. Their identity is unique — a hodgepodge of ethnicities that have mingled into a neighborhood mosaic within their shared vicinity. “There’s a lot of subcultures within L.A., and people in Boyle Heights want…

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    Bigger House on the Coast

    Written by Michelle Hong Cities whose homes average a million-dollar-plus price tag and more than a quarter of households with an income over $200K? Welcome to modern Orange County, and Dave Keehn’s world. Keehn moved from San Bernandino County to become Associate Professor at Talbot Theological Seminary ten years ago. He transferred his other job, battalion chaplain at Rancho Cucamonga Fire District, to the Orange County Fire Authority. Additionally, Keehn runs the youth ministry at his church in Dana Point. In all of these roles, he constantly works to burst what he calls “the OC bubble.” “My students don’t necessarily think of themselves as rich because they always know someone…

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    Costumes, and what you can do for Halloween

    Written by Shanley Knox Yesterday, my friends and I spent the afternoon perusing shops in Sherman Oaks. It was cloudy, and I found myself a hazelnut brew. There was a street fair going on, so we people-watched, laughed, went to an old record shop, and, of course, began the hunt for Halloween costumes. Masks, socks, wigs (“look at this one!”)–I tried on about five different pairs of glasses that all got shot down with a terribly serious “I’m having trouble even looking at you right now.” Halloween is my favorite holiday, and I plan to spend it in Hollywood this year. Proceeds from the party I’m going to go to Lullalee’s…

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    Mud Run Blog

    Mud Run Training Vid. from The Point on Vimeo. Written by George Garcia Day 1: I started my training today for the Irvine Mud Run. I only have five weeks left to prepare myself both mentally and physically for the three mile run. I have been running two miles three times a week and will now push myself to three miles four times a week. Along with running, I will also play basketball twice a week, but that probably won’t help me in the Mud Run. I grabbed my iPod and headphones and headed towards the track. I laced up my black Adidas shoes and stretched out. After tuning to…

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    Fighting for Common Ground

    Written by Katelynn Camp Fighting for Common Ground 9/11 sparked a now almost decade long controversy between Muslims and Americans of different faiths. In the minds of many Americans, “The War on Terrorism has,” as sophomore David Klein says, “morphed into a war on religion.” And the recent arguments over whether or not an Islam center named Park51 should be built two blocks away from Ground Zero show the bitter tensions between Islam and other faiths. As the body of Christ, Biola students and faculty are beginning to and need to continue thinking about the issue of religious division in America. Earlier this year, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf proposed that…

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    Left Foot First

    Written by Bethany Cissel A LIFE (holding on) March 3, 2009. Fullerton, California. We pray and find the right house number. A warm, friendly face steps into the frame of the front door. A hand gesturing to come into the house: handshakes and names, “please sit down.” Small talk. Breaking ice. The phone rings, and a conversation takes place in the kitchen. Outside, feet are shuffling upon the pavement. “Left foot first, left foot first” can be heard from the living room. A pink support belt and a walker prop the man scooting outside. The questions begin, and Jim and Miriam Mohler tell me their story of how cancer has…

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    Day in L.A.: Christina’s Story

    Written by Christina Hayes For some, Los Angeles is a distant city skyline, smoldering in a perpetual tide of ominous russet smog. Yes, Los Angeles is where we can find Beverly Hills, Rodeo Drive and Walt Disney Concert Hall, as well as art studios and galleries, but there is so much more than just glitz and glam. Today, my team — a photographer, a videographer and myself — plans to leave the safe confines of Biola University and the suburban community of La Mirada and enter into the heart of L.A. After the mundane droll of everyday standstill traffic, I entered Watts. Since most think of Watts as a neighborhood…